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How are diet and mental health linked?

Updated: May 8

The relationship between our diet and our mental health is complex. However, research shows a link between what we eat and how we feel.

Eating well can help you feel better.


You don’t have to make big changes to your diet, but see if you can try some of these tips.


  • Eat regularly. This can stop your blood sugar level from dropping, which can make you feel tired and bad-tempered.


  • Stay hydrated. Even mild dehydration can affect your mood, energy level and ability to concentrate.


  • Eat the right balance of fats. Your brain needs healthy fats to keep working well. They’re found in things such as olive oil, rapeseed oil, nuts, seeds, oily fish, avocados, milk and eggs. Avoid trans fats – often found in processed or packaged foods – as they can be bad for your mood and your heart health.


  • Include more whole grains, fruits and vegetables in your diet. They contain the vitamins and minerals your brain and body need to stay well.


  • Include some protein with every meal. It contains an amino acid that your brain uses to help regulate your mood.


  • Look after your gut health. Your gut can reflect how you’re feeling: it can speed up or slow down if you're stressed. Healthy food for your gut includes fruit, vegetables, beans and probiotics.


  • Be aware of how caffeine can affect your mood. It can cause sleep problems, especially if you drink it close to bedtime, and some people find it makes them irritable and anxious too. Caffeine is found in coffee, tea, cola, energy drinks and chocolate.



Sharing meals with other people

Eating meals with other people has many psychological, social and biological benefits. They give us a sense of rhythm and regularity in our lives, a chance to reflect on the day and feel connected to others. Biologically, eating in upright chairs helps with our digestion. Talking and listening also slow us down, so we don’t eat too fast.


Make the most of mealtimes by setting aside at least one day a week to eat with family and friends. Choose a meal that’s easy to prepare, so it doesn’t become a chore. Share responsibility, so everyone has a different task: doing the shopping, setting the table, cooking or washing up, for example. Keep the television off so you can all talk and share.




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